Jay Nance

Jay is a paramedic and emergency medicine educator with a background in 911, Critical Care, and teaching. He currently serves as a Customer Success Specialist for Pulsara.

Jay Nance

Jay Nance

Jay is a paramedic and emergency medicine educator with a background in 911, Critical Care, and teaching. He currently serves as a Customer Success Specialist for Pulsara.

Recent posts by Jay Nance

3 min read

Cognitive Bandwidth and Managing Yourself Before the Patient in EMS

By Jay Nance on Oct 18, 2021

The pager buzzes across the table as the lights flash and the tones drone through the crew room. You sit up straight, pulling on your boots and quickly making your way to the ambulance. It is time to go to work. 

From the moment the page drops, or the patient hits the ED door,  you as a human being undergo a change. No matter how seasoned you are, your body goes on full alert. Your heart rate goes up, and your brain begins cascading hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. You are now knocking on the door of fight or flight mode. Why is this knowledge important?

Topics: EMS Wellness
4 min read

Compassionate Care: Remembering the Art of Medicine

By Jay Nance on May 17, 2021

Or, When The Room Becomes Silent: What To Do After We’ve Done Everything

A great deal of emphasis is placed on out-of-hospital resuscitation. There are studies continually being published on dealing with the effectiveness of CPR and defibrillation, the use of mechanical compression devices, intubation or blind airways, medications, the list goes on...

Then, there are the practical skills: starting an IV, intubating, shocking the patient, drawing up medications, and the proper administration. 

And, when everything is put together—the skills, the book knowledge, the pathophysiology, medical history, etc.—that’s the science of medicine.

I remember my final practical exam in paramedic school. One of the scenarios included a patient in cardiac arrest. It was nerve-wracking, to say the least. I had drug dosages to memorize and time slots to remember. I had to dynamically alter my care based on the ECG changes shown on the monitor. Chaos. And then, when I started working in the field, I found that cardiac arrest management is like a tightly orchestrated concert. Everyone and everything has its role. And when executed perfectly, we provide our patients the greatest opportunity for survival.

But there’s more to patient care than science.

Topics: EMS